Les Pelland de la Bretagne aux Amériques

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3001 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I2002)
 
3002 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. PAYETTE, W.A. (I181391)
 
3003 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I133944)
 
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3005 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. PELLAND, K. (I67531)
 
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3007 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. TOURVILLE, M.C. (I220237)
 
3008 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. GRENIER, P.T. (I190571)
 
3009 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. PELLAND, C.M. (I168190)
 
3010 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. BRADSHAW, P. (I221821)
 
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3012 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. DERRY, D.P. (I191755)
 
3013 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. LAPLUME, E. (I190374)
 
3014 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. VISNEAU, R.J. (I191099)
 
3015 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. PELLAND, J.A.M. (I41319)
 
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3017 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I81803)
 
3018 WWI Draft Card Relative Phillip Pelland W Duluth MN.
Herménégilde Eugène Pelland 
PELLAND, Eugene Armin (I185719)
 
3019 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I7387)
 
3020 www.genalogics.com

BIOGRAPHY
Boniface I, the third son of Guillermo V 'il Vecchio', marchese de Monferrato, and Judith von Österreich, was born about 1150, after his father's return from the Second Crusade. He was a younger brother of Guillaume VII 'Longsword' de Monferrato, count of Jaffa and Ascalon, and of Conrad, marchese de Monferrato.

Boniface's youthful exploits in the late 1170s are recalled in the famous Epic letter _Valen marques, senher de Monferrat,_ by his good friend and court troubadour Raimbaut de Vaqueiras. These included the rescue of the heiress Jacopina of Ventimiglia from her uncle Count Otto, who was intending to deprive her of her inheritance and send her to Sardinia. Boniface arranged a marriage for her. When Albert of Malaspina (husband of one of Boniface's sisters) abducted Saldina de Mar, a daughter of a prominent Genoese family, Boniface rescued her and restored her to her lover Ponset d'Aguilar. Like the rest of the family, he also supported his cousin Friedrich I Barbarossa in his wars against the independent city communes of the Lombard League. Boniface's eldest brother Guillermo VII had died in 1177, soon after marrying Sybil d'Anjou, the heiress of the kingdom of Jerusalem. In 1179 Manuel I Komnenos, emperor of Byzantium, offered his daughter Maria Komnena as a bride to one of the sons of Guillermo V. Since Boniface, like his older brother Conrad, was already married, and Federico was a priest, the youngest brother Rainer married her instead, only to be murdered along with her during the usurpation of Andronicus I Komnenos.

In 1183 Boniface's nephew Baudouin V was crowned co-king of Jerusalem. Guillermo V went out to the Latin kingdom to support his grandson, leaving Conrad and Boniface in charge of Monferrato. However in 1187 Conrad also left for the East: Isaac II Angelos had offered his sister Theodora to Boniface as a wife, to renew the family's Byzantine alliance, but Boniface had just married for the second time, while Conrad was a recent widower.

In 1189 Boniface joined the council of regency for Tommaso I de Savoie, son of his cousin Umberto III, comte de Savoie, until the boy came of age about two years later. In 1191, after the new Emperor Heinrich VI granted him the county of Incisa, a fifteen-year war broke out against the neighbouring communes of Asti and Alessandria. Boniface joined the Cremona League, while the two cities joined the League of Milan. Boniface defeated the cities at Montiglio in June that year, but the war as a whole went badly for the dynasty's interests. At Quarto he and Vaqueiras saved his brother-in-law Alberto Malespina when he was unhorsed. The first phase of the war ended with a truce in April 1193. By now, Boniface was marquis of Monferrato, following the deaths of his father in 1191 and of Conrad, the newly elected king of Jerusalem, in 1192. (No claim to Monferrato ever seems to have been made on behalf of Conrad's posthumous daughter Maria.)

In June 1194 Boniface was appointed one of the leaders of Heinrich VI's expedition to Sicily. At Messina, amid the fighting between the Genoese and Pisan fleets, Vaqueiras protected his lord with his own shield - an act which helped the troubadour with a knighthood from Boniface that year after the campaign's successful conclusion with Heinrich's coronation as emperor in Palermo. In October 1197 the truce with Asti ended. Boniface made an alliance with Acqui in June 1198. There were numerous skirmishes and raids, including at Ricaldone and Caranzano, but by 1199 it was clear the war was lost, and Boniface entered into negotiations.

Throughout the 1180s and 1190s, despite the wars, Boniface had nevertheless presided over one of the most prestigious courts of chivalric culture and troubadour song. In the 12th century the Piemontèis language (which in the present day reflects more French and Italian influences) was virtually indistinguishable from the Occitan of Southern France and Catalonia. Besides Vaqueiras, visitors included Peire Vidal, Gaucelm Faidit, and Arnaut de Mareuil. Boniface's patronage was celebrated widely. To Gaucelm, he was _Mon Thesaur_ (My Treasure). Curiously, Vaqueiras sometimes addressed him as _N'Engles_ (Lord Englishman), but the in-joke is never explained. His sister Adilasia, wife of Manfredo II del Vasto, marquis de Saluzzo, also shared this interest and was mentioned by Vidal.

When the original leader of the Fourth Crusade, Thibaut III, comte de Champagne, died in 1201, Boniface was chosen as its new leader. He was an experienced soldier, and it was an opportunity to reassert his dynasty's reputation after defeat at home. Boniface's family was well-known in the east: his nephew Baudouin V de Monferrato and brother Conrad had been kings of Jerusalem, and his niece Maria de Monferrato, Conrad's daughter, was heiress of the kingdom.

Boniface's cousin Philipp von Hohenstaufen, King of The Romans, was married to Irene Angelina, a daughter of the deposed Byzantine emperor Isaac II Angelos and niece of Conrad's second wife Theodora Angelos. In the winter of 1201 Boniface spent Christmas with Philipp in Hagenau, and while there he also met with Alexios IV Angelos, Isaac II's son, who had escaped from the custody of his uncle Alexios III Komnenos Angelos. At this time the three discussed the possibility of using the crusading army to restore Alexios IV's right to the throne. Both Boniface and Alexios travelled separately to Rome to ask Pope Innocent III's blessing for the endeavour; however Boniface was specifically told by Innocent not to attack any Christians, including the Byzantines.

The crusader army was in debt to the doge of Venice, who had provided their fleet. He instructed to attack the rebellious cities of Trieste, Moglie and Zara and beat them into submission before sailing for Cairo. The pope was angered by these Christian cities being attacked by a crusader army. The doge, Enrico Dandolo, was now the true war leader of this crusade, with Boniface as only a figurehead. Alexios IV Angelos made many promises to the crusaders and their principal financier, the doge of Venice, for riches and honours if they would help him reclaim his kingdom. Dandolo placated the pope by having Alexios IV Angelos promise to submit the Orthodox Church to Rome when he was restored to his throne in Byzantium. This being done, the fleet set sail for Constantinople in 1203.

After the conquest of Constantinople in 1204, Boniface was assumed to be the new emperor, both by the western knights and the conquered Byzantine citizens. However the Venetians vetoed him, believing that he already had too many connections in the empire (and likely felt that they would not have a much influence in the new empire if Boniface was in control). Instead, they chose Baudouin VI-IX, Graaf van Vlaanderen. Boniface founded the kingdom of Thessalonica and also held all the territories east of the Bosporus and territories in Crete, though he later conceded Crete to Baudouin. Late 13th and 14th century sources suggest that Boniface based his claim on Thessalonica on the statement that his young brother Rainer had been granted Thessalonica on his marriage to Maria Komnena in 1180.

After 1170 Boniface married Elena di Busca, daughter of Anselmo, marques del Bosco. Of their three children, Guillermo VIII-VI would have progeny.

According to the chronicler Nicetas Choniates (1155-1215), Boniface remarried in late 1186- early 1187. This bride was possibly Jeanne de Châtillon-sur-Loing, daughter of Renaud de Châtillon, prince of Antioch, and his first wife Constance, princess of Antioch. _The Lignages d'Outremer_ name 'Maria e Joanna' as the two daughters of 'Rinaldo de Castellion' and his wife 'Costanza...la Nova Princessa', stating that Marie (presumably being an error for Agnes) married 'el re d'Ungaria' and Jeanne married 'el re de Salonichio'. This is the only reference so far found to this daughter but, if it is correct, 'el re de Salonichio' can only refer to Boniface. Jeanne would have been the maternal aunt of Boniface's last wife; apparently, the marriage was childless or, if they had children none survived to adulthood.

In 1204 in Constantinople Boniface married Margrete of Hungary, widow of Isaac II Angelos, emperor of Byzantium, and daughter of Béla III, king of Hungary. Their son Demetrius, emperor at Thessalonica, did not have progeny.

Boniface was killed in an ambush by the Bulgarians on 4 September 1207, and his head was sent to Bulgarian Tsar Kaloyan. The loyal Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, who had followed him to the East, probably died with him; it is significant that he composed no _planh_ (lament) to his memory. 
DE MONFERRATO, Bonifacio I marchese (I208848)
 
3021 www.genealogics,org

BIOGRAPHY
Leopold was born at Melk in 1073, the son of Leopold II, Markgraf von der Ostmark, and Ida von Ratelberg. With his unnamed first wife from the von Perg family he had a son Adalbert who did not have progeny. She died before 1105 and in 1106 Leopold married Agnes von Franken, daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV and Berta de Savoie, and widow of Friedrich I, Herzog von Schwaben. She was the widowed sister of Emperor Heinrich V whom he had supported against her father Heinrich IV. This connection to the Salians raised the importance of the House of Babenberg, to which important royal rights over the margraviate of Austria were granted. Leopold and Agnes had seven children of whom four would have progeny. By his marriage, Leopold also became stepfather of German King Konrad III.

A capable and loved ruler, Leopold helped arrange the Concordat of Worms (1122), which ended the Investiture Contest between Heinrich IV and Pope Gregory VII. He had no political ambitions and in 1125 refused to be nominated as candidate for the imperial crown.

He is mainly remembered for the development of the country and, in particular, the founding of several monasteries. His most important foundation is Klosterneuburg (1109). According to legend, the Virgin Mary appeared to him and led him to a place where he found the veil of his wife Agnes, who had lost it years earlier. He established the monastery of Klosterneuburg there. He subsequently expanded the settlement to become his residence. Leopold also founded the monasteries of Heiligenkreuz, Kleinmariazell and Seitenstetten which developed a territory still largely covered by forest. All of these induced the Church to canonise him in 1485.

Leopold also fostered the development of cities, such as Klosterneuburg, Vienna and Krems. The last one was granted the right to mint but never attained great importance. The writings of Heinrich of Melk and Ava of Göttweig, which are the first literary texts from Austria, date back to Leopold's time.

Leopold died in Vienna on 15 November 1136. He is buried in the Klosterneuburg Monastery, which he founded. His skull is kept in an embroidered reliquary, which leaves the forehead exposed; it also wears an archducal crown.

The brothers Joseph and Michael Haydn, each of whom sang in the choir of St. Stephen's Cathedral, both sang in that capacity at Klosterneuburg on 15 November, Leopoldstag. Michael Haydn later (1805) wrote a Mass in honour of Leopold, the _Missa sub titulo Sancti Leopoldi._ 
VON ÖSTERREICH, markgraf von der Ostmark Leopold III (I208850)
 
3022 www.genealogics.org


BIOGRAPHY
Ernst, known as 'the Brave', was born about 1027, the son of Adalbert I 'der Siegreiche' (the Victorious), Markgraf von der Ostmark, and his wife Glismond. He was the Babenberger margrave of Austria from 1055 to his death, following his father Adalbert. With his first wife Adelheid der Ostmark, daughter of Dedi II, Markgraf der Ostmark, and his wife Oda, he had a son Leopold who would succeed him and have progeny. Adelheid died 26 January 1071 and was buried at Melk. He then married Suanhild, daughter of Count Sieghard VII (Sieghardinger) and Philihild, daughter of Hartwig II, Pfalzgraf von Bayern.

He increased the territory of Austria by amalgamating the Bohemian and Hungarian marches into Austria. In his time, the colonisation of the Waldviertel was begun by his _Ministerialen_ (outposted administrators), the Künringer knights. In the Investiture Controversy he sided with Emperor Heinrich IV, and he battled against the Saxons, dying at the First Battle of Langensalza on 10 June 1075. 
OSTMARK, Ernst Markgraf von der (I208860)
 
3023 www.genealogics.org


REMARKS:
Crusader

BIOGRAPHY
Guillermo V 'il Vecchio' was born about 1115, the son of Raniero, marchese de Monferrato, and Gisela de Bourgogne. He was described by Acerbo Morena as of medium height and compact build, with a round, somewhat ruddy face and hair so fair as to be almost white. He was eloquent, intelligent and good-humoured, generous but not extravagant. Dynastically he was extremely well-connected: a nephew of Pope Calixtus II, a half-brother of Amadeo III, comte de Savoie, a brother-in-law of Louis VI 'the Fat' of France (through his half-sister Adèle de Savoie), and cousin of Alfonso VII of Castile.

In 1133 he married Judith von Österreich, daughter of Leopold III von Österreich, Markgraf von der Ostmark, and Agnes von Franken. They had several children, of whom five would have progeny, including his eldest son Guillermo VII.

The _vida_ (brief biography) of the troubadour Raimbaut de Vaqueiras claims that his daughter Beatrix, who married Enrico, marquis del Caretto, is the _Bel Cavalher_ (Fair Knight) of Vaqueiras' songs. However the lyrics of Vaqueiras' songs (as opposed to the later _vida_) describe Beatrix as daughter of Guillermo's son Boniface, and thus Guillermo's granddaughter.

Guillermo and Judith's powerful dynastic connections created difficulties in finding suitable wives for his sons; too many potential spouses were related within prohibited degrees. In 1167 he unsuccessfully tried to negotiate marriages for his eldest sons to daughters of Henry II of England - but the girls were very young at the time and related through Judith's descent from Guillaume V-VII, duke of Aquitaine, comte de Poitou. He then applied for sisters of William I of Scotland, who were not related, but were already married.

Guillermo took part in the Second Crusade, alongside his half-brother Amadeo III de Savoie (who died during the campaign), his nephew Louis VII of France, his brother-in-law Guido, conte di Biandrate, and his wife's German and Austrian relatives.

As supporters of the imperial party (later known as the Ghibellines), he and his sons fought with Emperor Friedrich I Barbarossa (Judith's nephew) in his lengthy struggle against the Lombard League. Following Barbarossa's capitulation with the Peace of Venice in 1177, Guillermo was left to deal with the rebellious towns in the area alone. Meanwhile, the Byzantine emperor Manuel I Komnenos sought support for his own politics in Italy.

Guillermo broke with Barbarossa and formed an alliance with Manuel. His eldest surviving son Conrad was taken prisoner by Barbarossa's chancellor, Archbishop Christian of Mainz, but then captured the chancellor in battle at Camerino. In 1179 Manuel suggested a marriage between his daughter Maria Komnena, second in line to the throne, and one of Guillermo's sons. As Conrad and Boniface were already married, the youngest son Rainer was married off to the princess, who was ten years his senior. Rainer and Maria were later killed during the usurpation of Andronicus I Komnenos, and the family rebuilt ties with Barbarossa.

In 1183, with the accession of his grandson Baudouin V, a minor, as co-king of Jerusalem, Guillermo, then in his late sixties, left the government of Monferrato to Conrad and Boniface, and returned to the east. He was granted the castle of St. Elias (present day El Taiyiba). He fought in the Battle of Hattin in 1187, where he was captured by Saladin's forces. In the meantime his son Conrad had arrived at Tyre from Constantinople. Conrad was given the command of the defences. During the siege of Tyre in November that year, he is said to have refused to surrender as much as a stone of its walls to liberate his father, even threatening to shoot him with a crossbow himself when Saladin had him presented as a hostage. Eventually Saladin withdrew his army from Tyre. In 1188 Guillermo was released unharmed at Tortosa, and seems to have ended his days in Tyre with his son. He probably died in the summer of 1191; Conrad describes himself as _marchionis Monisferrati filius_ in a charter of May that year. Guillermo was succeeded by Guilliermo VII, who became one of the leaders of the French forces taking part in the Fourth Crusade, which left for Palestine in 1198. 
DE MONFERRATO, Guillermo V marchese (I158603)
 
3024 www.genealogics.org

BIOGRAPHY
Agnes was born at the end of 1072, the second daughter of Emperor Heinrich IV and Berta de Savoie.

On 24 March 1079, when Agnes was seven, she was betrothed to Friedrich I, Herzog von Schwaben, son of Friedrich von Büren, Graf im Risgau, and Hildegard von Schwaben. Their marriage between 1086 and 1089 would give rise to the later claim of the house of Schwaben to the German throne. They had eleven children, of whom Friedrich II, Konrad III and Heilika would have progeny.

Friedrich died in 1105 and in 1106 Agnes became the second wife of Leopold III von Österreich, Markgraf von der Ostmark. The marriage was a reward for Leopold's backing of her brother, the future emperor Heinrich V against his father Emperor Heinrich IV. Agnes and Leopold had numerous children of whom Heinrich II, Agnes, Judith and Gertrud would have progeny.

Agnes was said to have used her strong religious faith and belief in the afterlife to sustain the loss of more than half of her children in her lifetime. She died in Klosterneuburg on 24 September 1143, almost seven years after her husband. The strong bonds between the Hohenstaufen and the Babenbergs were established through Agnes. Like her husband she was buried in the Augustinian monastery at Klosterneuburg. 
VON FRANKEN, Agnes (I159324)
 
3025 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. OSTMARK, D.I.M.d. (I208862)
 
3026 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I208864)
 
3027 www.genealogics.org

BIOGRAPHY
Gunther was the margrave of Merseburg from 965 until his death, after which the march of Merseburg was united with that of Meissen. He was a scion of the Ekkeharding noble family first recorded around Naumburg, which may have been affiliated with the Ottonian dynasty. In 962 he was already regarded as a margrave in the newly created diocese of Magdeburg, alongside Graf Wigger of Bilstein and Wigbert.

He was appointed to the newly created Merseburg march by Emperor Otto I following the death of Margrave Gero 'the Great' in 965, after which the _Marca Geronis_ was split in several small parts. The establishment of the march was followed by the Merseburg diocese under Bishop Boso in 968.

Gunther supported Heinrich II 'der Zänker', Herzog von Bayern, in his revolt against Emperor Otto II and was therefore deposed as margrave and banished in 976, while his march fell to Thietmar, margrave of Meissen. Gunther nevertheless became reconciled with Otto II and after Thietmar's death in 979 he was reinstalled as margrave.

He joined Otto's campaign in Calabria in 979 and died there in the Battle of Stilo against the Saracens on 15 July 982. He was succeeded by Rikdag, who then united the marches of Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz under his rule.

He left three sons: Ekkehard I, who would have progeny and succeed Rikdag as margrave of Meissen in 985; Gunzelin of Kuckenburg, who succeeded his brother in 1002, and Bruno, who defended Meissen against the troops of Boleslaw I Chrobry, king of Poland, in 1009. 
VON MERSEBURG, Gunther Markgraf (I208866)
 
3028 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. VON ÖSTERREICH, L.I. (I208851)
 
3029 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. D'ANTIOCHE, B. (I208820)
 
3030 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. DE MACÉDOINE, P.I. (I198197)
 
3031 www.wikipedia.org

John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (29 November 1310 ? 4 October 1361) was the only son of John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray, by his first wife, Aline de Brewes.[1]

He was born 29 November 1310 at Hovingham, Yorkshire.[1]

Mowbray's father, the 2nd Baron, sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 against Edward II, and was taken prisoner at the battle. He was hanged at York on 23 March 1322, and his estates forfeited.[1] His wife and son John were imprisoned in the Tower of London until Edward II was deposed by his wife, Queen Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. The Mowbrays were released in 1327.

The 3rd Baron de Mowbray was reportedly in Edward III's good graces, being present in France in the War of the Breton Succession for the sieges of Nantes and Aguillon. He was also on the English side at the Battle of Neville's Cross in the Second War of Scottish Independence.

He died of the plague at York on 4 October 1361, and was buried at the Friars Minor in Bedford.[2] 
DE MOWBRAY, 3rd Lord Mowbray John (I198522)
 
3032 www.wikipedia.org

John de Mowbray, born 25 June 1340 at Epworth, Lincolnshire, was the son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, of Axholme, Lincolnshire, by his second wife, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1][2][3] He had two sisters, Blanche and Eleanor (for details concerning his sisters see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray.[4]
Career

He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany.[2][3] He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere.[3] By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[2][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost £1000.[3]

In about 1343 an agreement had been made for a double marriage between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Audrey Montagu, the granddaughter of Thomas of Brotherton, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister, Blanche, and Audrey's brother, Edward Montagu. Neither marriage took place.[3] Instead, about 1349 a double marriage was solemnized between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister Blanche, and Elizabeth Segrave's brother John, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of the Earl of Lancaster in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][3] Mowbray had little financial benefit from his marriage during his lifetime as a result of the very large jointure which had been awarded to Elizabeth Segrave's mother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who lived until 1399.[6][3] However when Elizabeth Segrave's father, John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, died on 1 April 1353, Edward III allowed Mowbray to receive a small portion of his wife's eventual inheritance. Estate accounts for 1367 indicate that Mowbray enjoyed an annual income of almost £800 at that time.[3]

Mowbray was summoned to Parliament from 14 August 1362 to 20 January 1366.[2] On 10 October 1367 he appointed attorneys in preparation for travel beyond the seas; these appointments were confirmed in the following year.[7] He was slain by the Turks near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.[8] A letter from the priory of 'Peyn' written in 1396 suggests that he was initially buried at the convent at Pera opposite Constantinople;[9][10] according to the letter, 'at the instance of his son Thomas' his bones had now been gathered and were being sent to England for burial with his ancestors.[7]

His will was proved at Lincoln on 17 May 1369.[11][5] His wife, Elizabeth, predeceased him in 1368 by only a few months.[5] 
MOWBRAY, 4th Lord Mowbray John (I198520)
 
3033 www.wikipedia.org

Like his uncle Sir Hugh, Waterton, he entered the service of Henry Bolingbroke, the future Henry IV. In 1391 he was appointed Master Forester at Pontefract Castle, and in that year accompanied Bolingbroke to the siege of Vilnius.[5] He was with Bolingbroke when he returned to Vilnius in the following year.[2] From 1392 he received a yearly fee from Bolingbroke of £6 13s 4d,[2] and in 1398 Bolingbroke granted him an additional annuity of 10 marks. In 1399 he was Steward and Constable at Pontefract, as well as Constable at Tickhill Castle, positions which 'made him a dominant figure in the West Riding of Yorkshire and in north Nottinghamshire'. He remained in these posts despite Richard II's confiscation of Bolingbroke's estates after the death of John of Gaunt in 1399. In June of that year Waterton was among the first of Bolingbroke's retainers to join him at Ravenspur, where he arrived with two hundred foresters,[2] although according to a speech by the Earl of Northumberland in Shakespeare's Richard II, Waterton was among those who sailed with Bolingbroke from the continent 
WATERTON, Robert (I198511)
 
3034 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I198540)
 
3035 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. ALLARD, J.R. (I198442)
 
3036 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. D'ILLIERS, Y. (I237101)
 
3037 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. LANGLOIS, Y. (I121743)
 
3038 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I229627)
 
3039 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Famille F98398
 
3040 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. YOUSO, J.B. (I68362)
 
3041 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. LAPORTE, Y.G.J. (I70738)
 
3042 Yves Martin dans les documents:

Le 14 avril 1673- engagement à La Rochelle devant le notaire Jean Michelon - Yves Martin 18 ans environs de Péaule en Bretagne. Donc, né vers 1655, ce qui correspond bien avec Yves Martin baptisé le 8 mai 1655 à Péaule, fils de Jean Martin et Marie Bernard.
Le 19 juillet 1679 - paroisse Notre-Dame de Montréal, Yves Martin est parrain d'Yves Benoist, fils de Paul Benoît dit Nivernais et d'Élisabeth Gobinet. Yves Martin demeure chez M. Lemoyne à Montréal.
Le 30 septembre 1682 - à Montréal devant le notaire Maugué est rédigé une transaction entre René Orieu et Antoine Jusseaume d'une part, et Yves Martin d'autre part.
Le 3 mars 1699- contrat de mariage sous seing privé devant le père Michel, récollet. Ce contrat demeure introuvable.
Son acte de mariage ainsi que les actes de baptême de ses premiers enfants restent introuvable, probablement perdus quand les Américains ont mis feu à l'église de Ste-Anne-de-Sorel.
Le 13 août 1705- sa fille Marie Anne est baptisée à l'Île-Dupas. Son père est nommé Yves Martin dit Pellelan - Première attestation du surnom Pelland.
Le 25 mars 1709 - sa fille Marie Geneviève est baptisée à l'Île-Dupas, les parents sont nommés Hive Martin et Marie Pied.
Le 25 novembre 1709 - contrat de concession de terre à Yves Martin dit Penelan - Notaire Daniel Normandin
Le 4 mars 1711 - son fils François est baptisé à Sorel. Les parents sont Hyves Martin dit Pellan et Marie Pied.
Le 11 mai 1713 - son fils Pierre est baptisé à Sorel. Les parents sont Hyves Martin dit Pelland et Marie Pied
Le 24 janvier 1715 - son fils Pierre est enterré à Sorel. Les parents sont Hives Martin et Marie Pied
Le 15 février 1715 - Procès entre Antoine Puypéroux, sieur de LaFosse, demandeur, et Jacques Brisset, père et fils, défendeurs, pour la restitution d'objets divers -Yves Martin dit Pellan âgé de quarante-sept ans est témoin, donc né vers 1668, ce qui correspondrait mieux avec un autre Yves Martin comme celui baptisé le 13 janvier 1669 à Péaule, fils de Guillaume Martin et Julienne Jarlegan. De plus, la différence d'âge entre Yves Martin et sa femme, Marie Piet ne serait que huit ans au lieu de vingt ans. Par contre, s'il y avait vraiment deux Yves Martin en Nouvelle-France, on devrait trouver deux actes de sépultures ou peut-être deux actes de mariages, ce qui n'est pas le cas.
Le 15 septembre 1715 - Yves Martin agit de témoin dans l'acte de sépulture de sa belle-mère, Marguerite Chemereau. Il est nommé Hyves Martin.
Le 30 mars 1716 -notaire Daniel Normandin- Inventaire des meubles des effets de Jean Piet dit Trampe, beau-père d'Yves Martin. Yves Martin est présent comme témoin. On le nomme Yves Martin dit Penelan.
Le 2 juin 1716- sépulture de sa fille aînée, Marie Martin à l'Île-Dupas. Les parents sont nommés Hives Martin et Marie Pied.
Le 28 mars 1719 - notaire Daniel Normandin - Partage et abandon passé entre Piet Trampe père et ses enfants et gendres. On le nomme Yves Martin dit Penelan.
Le 14 février 1721 - Île-Dupas -rapport de l'assemblée des résidents - Yves Martin
Le 4 mars 1721 - Sorel - rapport de l'assemblée des résidents - Yves Martin dit Pennelan
Le 9 août 1723- Berthier- Dénombrement de Pierre de L'Estage - le nommé Penelan fils et Yves Martin dit Penelan possèdent des terres le long de la rivière Bayonne.
Le 24 novembre 1727- Berthier - Mariage de sa fille Marie Anne Martin avec Michel Boucher, fils de Charles Boucher et Marguerite Pelletier.
Le 3 avril 1728 -Berthier- acte de sépulture d'Yve Martin Pellant
1728- Puypéroux de la Fosse - Inventaire des biens d'Yves Martin - Acte perdu 
PENELAN, Yves Martin dit (I1)
 
3043 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. RONDEAU, M. (I29473)
 
3044 Au moins une personne vivante ou marquée privée est liée à cette note - Les détails ne sont donc pas publiés. Privée (I13968)
 
3045 [Thélesphore Sylvestre, frère de l'enfant, Jeanne Sylvestre, soeur de
l'enfant] parrain et marraine de Hercule fils 
SYLVESTRE, Hercule Barthélemy (I54595)
 
3046 ¸A vérifier RAINVILLE, Roméo (I123958)
 

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